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What can your wrist tell you?

Early development

Are you what you wear?

WWI and the interwar years

Ever use the following smart remark when someone asks you what time it is, "A hair past a freckle, eastern elbow time." Not sure why this memory came back when starting this article, but feel free to use it next time you are caught without your watch, and face the "¿Qué hora es?" question.

People love to judge a book by its cover and people by external appurtenances. In the spirit of this pastime, let's take a deep dive into what your wrist says about you. Specifically the watches you wear, when you wear them, and where you wear them. It's the horological version of bird watching.

In five short years following Bleriot's flight, Europe and most of the rest of the world was plunged into the horror of WWI. Dirigibles and observation balloons were still in use but eventually succumbed to the rapidly developing airplanes. Watches and compasses now served to guide bombers to targets to deliver their ordnance as accurately as possible.

The airplanes of WWI were often hard to control. That meant the pilot was ill-advised to take his hands off the controls to retrieve his pocket watch. The same value that leads Santos-Dumont to seek a solution carried full force into combat.

Most aerial combat during WWI occurred during the day due to lack of proper instruments and lights. Bad weather almost always grounded the planes of the time. So watches did not need large quantities of luminescence. The just needed to be easy to read. Therefore, the iconic black dial and large contrasting Arabic numerals became standard issue.

As a result of experiences in WWI, U.S. Navy captain Philip Van Horn Weems designed an independently adjustable seconds ring. This feature allowed pilots to accurately synchronize their watch with a radio time signal without stopping the sweep seconds hand. Although "hacking" watch movements to allow everyone in a combat unit to synchronize their watches to the second, the practice could result in throwing pilots off course, ruin missions, and risk the airplane and crew.

Following his successful trans-Atlanic flight in 1927, Charles Lindbergh collaborated with Weems to develop the Hour Angle system which further enabled the wristwatch to determine longitude.

The German military specified a design that set the standard for what we think of as a classic pilot's watch today. By 1936, aviation advances allowed airplanes to fly at all hours and in foul weather (although grounding in severe conditions was common). The result was the Beobachtungsuhr (B-Uhr), or Observer.

"LIV watches are built to meet the demands of our fans’ lifestyles. Whatever you are into, wherever you are into it, make a statement with one of our masterpieces."

- Chaz Chazanow

Co-Founder at LIV Watches

All business

If you see someone wearing a GX1-A, it's a good indication they are all business. They pick the GX1-A because it is a great value; a no-nonsense timepiece that looks good everywhere; from the office to a trek into the Himalayas.

Sports aficionado

Make no mistake, chronograph movements are great additions to any collection. When you see a person with one of these beauties, you might suspect their passions run to sporting endeavors and split-second victories. Automatic or quartz, you can't go wrong with these.

Water sign

Does it mean someone is like Jaques Cousteau if you see them with a dive watch? Does wearing these submersible timepieces indicate being born under a water sign? Maybe, and maybe not. Some folks take to water like a duck and want to be able to keep track of time without bringing along their smartphone. When you see someone wearing a diver's watch, it is a good sign they are practical and think ahead.

"We design our watches to be an extraordinary extension of our fans' personalities and interests. They are individuals in every respect. It’s only fitting our watches should reflect the same individuality."

- Esti Chazanow

Co-Founder at LIV Watches

Rugged individualist

There is a definite statement being made when you see a person with a pilot's watch. These wristwatches harken back to the era of deadly airborne duels, with the victors toasting their accomplishments around a fire back at the aerodrome. The person sporting a pilot's watch is almost certainly their own person, up for any challenge.

Make a statement

"Round watches? Not for me. Everyone has a ROUND watch." When you see someone with a timekeeper that deviates from a perfectly circular case, your suspicions might be that they march to the beat of a different drummer. Sure, there are more extreme ways to make a statement, but the Rebel is designed to do it painlessly and with great style. Bucking the trend doesn't mean your wrist has to look shabby.

Watch geek

Is there someone you think might be a watch geek? How can you tell beyond a shadow of a doubt? See what horological plumage they display on their wrist. There's your answer. Complications? Unusual materials? Lots of buttons and subdials? Yep, that there is a dyed-in-the-wool watch geek. Don't worry, they aren't dangerous unless they corner you to talk watches.

History buff

People wear watches for many reasons, as this article has illustrated. So, what does a history buff choose to demonstrate his passion? How about a watch that brings the origins of watchmaking and space triumphs together? When you see someone wearing a bronze watch the celebrates a historical event, say landing the first man on the moon, that should tell you this person knows their history and doesn't mind celebrating it.

Early development

Are you what you wear?

Ever use the following smart remark when someone asks you what time it is, "A hair past a freckle, eastern elbow time." Not sure why this memory came back when starting this article, but feel free to use it next time you are caught without your watch, and face the "¿Qué hora es?" question.
 
People love to judge a book by its cover and people by external appurtenances. In the spirit of this pastime, let's take a deep dive into what your wrist says about you. Specifically the watches you wear, when you wear them, and where you wear them. It's the horological version of bird watching.

Given the fact that Santos-Dumont was a regular participant at the airshows of the day, other pilots exhibited one of the earliest known examples of wrist envy. As a result, the pilot's watch soon became a "must-have" instrument in the cockpit. And, not just for "keeping up the the Santos-Dumonts" reasons. Advances in powered flight were enabling planes to fly further and faster. With a reliable watch and a compass, pilots had the tools they needed to calculate time-speed-distance, determine when to move to the next leg of a flight, judge how much fuel was left, and generally be safer in the air.

Pilot Louis Bleriot wore a Zenith wristwatch when he made aviation history being the first to fly an airplace across the English Channel in July of 1909. Taking advantage of the feat for marketing purposes, Bleriot commented upon landing that he was very satisfied with his Zenith and would recommend it to others. The records are unclear on the point of Bleriot's comment being spontaneous or rehearsed.

WWI and the interwar years

"Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua."

- Chaz Chazanow

Founder at LIV Watches

Advances during WWII

French watchmaker Zenith continued to manufacture their pilot's watches. Striking a neutral stance, Zenith sold its watches to both the Allies and the Axis. They used their 1939 Type Montre d"Aeronef design as the basis of their wristwatch. It featured the black dial and white arabic numerals with the large onion-style crown at 3 o'clock.

The United States did not produce a purpose-made pilot's watch. One of the most widely produced models supplied to American forces was the A-11. Manufactured by Bulouva, Waltham, and Elgin, the watch featured the required high-visibility black dial with white Arabic numerals. The manually wound movement featured a hacking function for synchronization. Some A-11s were waterproof, some were dust proof, some had luminous hands, , and some did not. All had a larger crown at 3 o'clock, but not in the onion style.

Postwar evolution

"LIV watches are built to meet the demands of our fans’ lifestyles. Whatever you are into, wherever you are into it, make a statement with one of our masterpieces."

- Chaz Chazanow

Founder at LIV Watches

All business

If you see someone wearing a GX1-A, it's a good indication they are all business. They pick the GX1-A because it is a great value; a no-nonsense timepiece that looks good everywhere; from the office to a trek into the Himalayas.

Sports aficionado

Make no mistake, chronograph movements are great additions to any collection. When you see a person with one of these beauties, you might suspect their passions run to sporting endeavors and split-second victories. Automatic or quartz, you can't go wrong with these.

Water sign

Does it mean someone is like Jaques Cousteau if you see them with a dive watch? Does wearing these submersible timepieces indicate being born under a water sign? Maybe, and maybe not. Some folks take to water like a duck and want to be able to keep track of time without bringing along their smartphone. When you see someone wearing a diver's watch, it is a good sign they are practical and think ahead.

"Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua."

- Esti Chazanow

Co-Founder at LIV Watches

"We design our watches to be an extraordinary extension of our fans' personalities and interests. They are individuals in every respect. It’s only fitting our watches should reflect the same individuality."

- Esti Chazanow

Co-Founder at LIV Watches

Rugged individualist

There is a definite statement being made when you see a person with a pilot's watch. These wristwatches harken back to the era of deadly airborne duels, with the victors toasting their accomplishments around a fire back at the aerodrome. The person sporting a pilot's watch is almost certainly their own person, up for any challenge.

Make a statement

"Round watches? Not for me. Everyone has a ROUND watch." When you see someone with a timekeeper that deviates from a perfectly circular case, your suspicions might be that they march to the beat of a different drummer. Sure, there are more extreme ways to make a statement, but the Rebel is designed to do it painlessly and with great style. Bucking the trend doesn't mean your wrist has to look shabby.

Watch geek

Is there someone you think might be a watch geek? How can you tell beyond a shadow of a doubt? See what horological plumage they display on their wrist. There's your answer. Complications? Unusual materials? Lots of buttons and subdials? Yep, that there is a dyed-in-the-wool watch geek. Don't worry, they aren't dangerous unless they corner you to talk watches.

History buff

People wear watches for many reasons, as this article has illustrated. So, what does a history buff choose to demonstrate his passion? How about a watch that brings the origins of watchmaking and space triumphs together? When you see someone wearing a bronze watch the celebrates a historical event, say landing the first man on the moon, that should tell you this person knows their history and doesn't mind celebrating it.